NEWS: Universal unleashes Classic Monsters on DVD, Blu-ray in September

Universal Studios Home Entertainment will unleashing the classic monsters of the silver screen on the world again with a series of DVD and Blu-ray re-releases of the early cult films of our favorite genre. And we are talking true cult classics here, like director James Whale’s ‘The Bride of Frankenstein’ starring Boris Karloff in one of his most memorable roles, the restored version of Tod Browning and Karl Freund’s ‘Dracula’ from 1931 starring Bela Lugosi as well as Jack Arnold’s 1954 Monster from the Black Lagoon’ starring Richard Carlson, Julie Adams and Richard Denning. Come on in to find out what other monsters Universal is freeing from their vaults. The DVDs and Blu-rays will be available starting September 2.

THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN
-Theatrical Release: April 22, 1935
In one of the most popular horror films of all time, The Bride of Frankenstein, Boris Karloff reprises his role as the silver screen’s most misunderstood monster who now longs for a mate. Continuing exactly where the original left off, the critically acclaimed sequel introduces Dr. Pretorius (Ernest Thesiger) as a deranged scientist who forces Dr. Frankenstein (Colin Clive) to help him create a companion for the monster. Once again directed by James Whale and adapted from Mary Shelley’s classic novel, the sequel features outstanding makeup and special effects, instantly making the Bride of Frankenstein (Elsa Lanchester) one of the most recognizable monsters of all time.

CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON – Theatrical Release: February 12, 1954
Perfectly blending Universal’s classic monster heritage with the science-fiction explosion of the 1950s, Creature from the Black Lagoon tells the mythical story of a dangerous half-human, half-fish creature lurking in the depths of the Amazon. After discovering a unique prehistoric claw fossil on an expedition deep in the jungle, archeologists investigate its origins which lead them directly to a mysterious creature. Led by marine life specialist David Reed (Richard Carlson), the men try to capture the monster who has become obsessed with David’s assistant, Kay (Julia Adams). Originally released in 3D, this thrilling adventure inspired sequels, TV series and more that continue to strengthen the monster’s legacy to this day.

DRACULA (1931) – Theatrical Release: February 12, 1931
Dracula (The Restored Version) Although there have been numerous screen versions of Bram Stoker’s classic tale, none is more enduring than the 1931 original. The ominous portrayal of Count Dracula by Bela Lugosi, combined with horror specialist director Tod Browning, help to create the film’s eerie mood. Dracula remains a masterpiece not only of the genre, but for all time. Dracula (Featuring New Music By Philip Glass) The original version of Dracula starring Bela Lugosi has been remastered to feature a specially-composed musical score by world-renowned composer Philip Glass and performed by Kronos Quartet. Glass’ music lends greater depth to an already timeless classic! Dracula (Original Spanish Version) Filmed simultaneously with the English language version, the Spanish version of Dracula is completely different, yet equally ominous vision of the horror classic. Utilizing the same sets and identical script, cinematographer George Robinson and a vibrant cast including Carlos Villarias and Lupita Tovar deliver this chilling and evocative tale.

FRANKENSTEIN – Theatrical Release: November 21, 1931
An unforgettable masterpiece, the original Frankenstein stars Boris Karloff as the screen’s most tragic and iconic monster in what many consider to be the greatest horror film ever made. Tampering with life and death, Dr. Frankenstein (Colin Clive) pieces together salvaged body parts to bring a human monster to life. The mad scientist’s dreams are shattered by his creation’s violent rage as the monster awakens to a world in which he is unwelcome. Featuring groundbreaking makeup by Jack Pierce, director James Whale’s adaptation of Mary Shelley’s masterpiece novel blends themes of horror, isolation and compassion, and remains one of the most shocking movies of all time.

THE INVISIBLE MAN – Theatrical Release: November 13, 1933
Claude Rains delivers a remarkable performance in his screen debut as a mysterious doctor who discovers a serum that makes him invisible. Covered by bandages and dark glasses, Rains arrives at a small English village and attempts to hide his amazing discovery. But the same drug which renders him invisible slowly drives him to commit acts of unspeakable terror. Based on H.G. Well’ classic novel and direct by the master of macabre James Whale, The Invisible Man not only fueled a host of sequels but features some special effects that are still imitated today.

THE MUMMY (1932) – Theatrical Release: December 22, 1932
Boris Karloff’s legendary performance has become a landmark in the annals of screen history. As the mummy, Im-Ho-Tep, he is accidentally revived after 3,700 years by a team of British archaeologists. It is revealed in a flashback that he was a high priest, embalmed alive for trying to revive the vestal virgin whom he loved, after she had been sacrificed. Alive again, he sets out to find his lost love. Today, over 50 years after The Mummy was first released, this brooding dream-like film remains a masterpiece not only of the genre, but for all time.

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1943) – Theatrical Release: August 27, 1943
One of the most popular stories of all time, Gaston Leroux’s The Phantom of the Opera is the legendary horror tale starring Claude Rains as the masked phantom of the Paris Opera House. Following a tragic accident that leaves him disfigured, crazed composer Erique Claudin transforms into a masked phantom who schemes to make beautiful young soprano Christine Dubois (Susanna Foster) the star of the opera and wreak revenge on those who stole his music. A heroic baritone (Nelson Eddy) tries to win the affections of Christine as he tracks down the disfigured “monster” who has begun murdering those who resist his mad demands. Inspired by the original 1925 silent version, this lavish Technicolor production remains one of the most unforgettable adaptations ever to be filmed.

THE WOLF MAN – Theatrical Release: December 12, 1941
“Even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright”. In 1941, The Wolf Man introduced the world to a new Universal movie monster and the mythology of the werewolf was redefined forever. Featuring a heartbreaking performance by Lon Chaney Jr. and groundbreaking make-up by Jack Pierce, this story of a cursed man who transforms into a deadly werewolf when the moon is full has not only become a masterpiece of the horror genre, but of all time.

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